Liberté, Egalité, Fraternité: 225 Years of an Unchanging Left

The same goals, since the French Revolution.

Plus ça change, say the French, plus c’est la même chose. The more things change, the more they stay the same. This is certainly true of revolutionary rhetoric: 225 years after the French Revolution, the demands of the Left can still be summed up in the three words of the Jacobin slogan — liberté, égalité, fraternité. Not only do those words sum up the Left, they provide a vivid contrast between the values of a civil society based on biblical morality and the Left’s skewed views.

Liberté: Thomas Jefferson saw “liberty” as one of the fundamental, natural-law rights of man, enshrined alongside “life” and the “pursuit of happiness” in the American Declaration of Independence. The Constitution was later designed to preserve and protect natural rights.

Yet “liberty” does not mean freedom from discipline or restraint. John Adams declared of the American Constitution that it was fit only for a “moral and religious people.”

Read more by Avner Zarmi at PJmedia.com