On this day in 1956, Martin Luther King voted for Eisenhower/Nixon

On this day in 1956, Martin Luther King voted for the Republican presidential ticket, Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon.

Martin Luther King told Nixon of his vote during a public meeting in Ghana, where they were attending a presidential inauguration.

While campaigning for re-election, Vice President Richard Nixon declared: “Most of us will live to see the day when American boys and girls will sit, side by side, at any school – public or private – with no respect paid to the color of skin. Segregation, discrimination and prejudice have no place in America.”

The following year, Vice President Nixon helped defeat the Democrat filibuster against the GOP’s 1957 Civil Rights Act.

From GrandOldPartisan

How Eisenhower solved illegal border crossings from Mexico

George W. Bush isn’t the first Republican president to face a full-blown immigration crisis on the US-Mexican border.

Fifty-three years ago, when newly elected Dwight Eisenhower moved into the White House, America’s southern frontier was as porous as a spaghetti sieve. As many as 3 million illegal migrants had walked and waded northward over a period of several years for jobs in California, Arizona, Texas, and points beyond.

President Eisenhower cut off this illegal traffic. He did it quickly and decisively with only 1,075 United States Border Patrol agents – less than one-tenth of today’s force. The operation is still highly praised among veterans of the Border Patrol.

Read more by John Dillin from csmonitor.com, 2006

Eisenhower’s “Military-Industrial Complex” Speech Origins and Significance

January 17, 1961
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gg-jvHynP9Y

President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s farewell address, known for its warnings about the growing power of the “military-industrial complex,” was nearly two years in the making. This Inside the Vaults video short follows newly discovered papers revealing that Eisenhower was deeply involved in crafting the speech, which was to become one of the most famous in American history. The papers were discovered by the family of Eisenhower speechwriter Malcolm Moos and donated to the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum. Eisenhower Library director Karl Weissenbach and presidential historian and Foundation for the National Archives board member Michael Beschloss discuss the evolution of the speech.

Eisenhower’s farewell address

How Eisenhower solved illegal border crossings from Mexico

George W. Bush isn’t the first Republican president to face a full-blown immigration crisis on the US-Mexican border.

Fifty-three years ago, when newly elected Dwight Eisenhower moved into the White House, America’s southern frontier was as porous as a spaghetti sieve. As many as 3 million illegal migrants had walked and waded northward over a period of several years for jobs in California, Arizona, Texas, and points beyond.

President Eisenhower cut off this illegal traffic. He did it quickly and decisively with only 1,075 United States Border Patrol agents – less than one-tenth of today’s force. The operation is still highly praised among veterans of the Border Patrol.

Read more by John Dillin from csmonitor.com, July 6, 2006