Wauwatosa Branch Christmas Party on Tue Dec 12

mkegop-logo-squareBlockbeginning at 5:30 PM at Joel and Linda Richmond’s house, 7315 Portland Avenue in Wauwatosa (north of Bluemound Road). The party is a potluck, so please mark your calendar and start planning what you’d like to bring. The Richmonds will provide the drinks. This is always a good social event. Our Republican candidates will also be invited to speak.

Christmas cookies for the Troops in Afghanistan on Sat Dec 2

from 1-4 PM. Bring Christmas cookies that are home-baked or are bakery-quality. Jean Dohnal and Leah Vukmir are co-chairs. Last year the Dohnals got hundreds of dozens of cookies for the troops. The Brookfield Legion Post takes them and sends them overseas. Alioto’s Restaurant is at 3041 N. Mayfair Road, south of Burleigh.

Happy Constitution Day!

http://www.constitutionday.com/

On this day, September 17 in 1787, our Founding Fathers adjourned the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

The US Constitution has been the cornerstone of the beliefs of the Republican Party since it was founded in Ripon, Wisconsin in 1854. Although changes have been made over the years, these changes have only made it a stronger document for governing the United States and the Republican Party today.

We should use today as a reminder of what our Founding Fathers fought for: economic freedom, individual liberty, and limited government.

Constitution of the United States

Would You Be This Brave?

Fifty-six men signed the Declaration of Independence.

On July 4, 1776, after months of heated debate, representatives of the Continental Congress voted unanimously that “these United Colonies are and of right ought to be Free and Independent States.”

Thirteen colonies voted to become something new: the United States of America. All they had to do was to win their independence from a government that would consider them traitors.

Fifty-six men bravely affixed their signatures to the Declaration of Independence. What sort of men were they? And what became of them?

Twenty-four were lawyers and jurists, 11 were merchants, nine were farmers or plantation owners. They were well-educated men of means. All of them had a great deal to lose when they voted to defy what was then the most powerful nation on Earth.

One of the signers was . . .

Read more by Chip Wood at theNewAmerican.com