How Eisenhower solved illegal border crossings from Mexico

George W. Bush isn’t the first Republican president to face a full-blown immigration crisis on the US-Mexican border.

Fifty-three years ago, when newly elected Dwight Eisenhower moved into the White House, America’s southern frontier was as porous as a spaghetti sieve. As many as 3 million illegal migrants had walked and waded northward over a period of several years for jobs in California, Arizona, Texas, and points beyond.

President Eisenhower cut off this illegal traffic. He did it quickly and decisively with only 1,075 United States Border Patrol agents – less than one-tenth of today’s force. The operation is still highly praised among veterans of the Border Patrol.

Read more by John Dillin from csmonitor.com, 2006

The law already allows Donald Trump to build the wall

There’s no shortage of people telling Donald Trump he can’t build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. And maybe, in the end, he won’t do it. But at the moment Trump takes office, he will have the legal authority and the money he needs to get started on the wall. Yes, there will be obstacles — what’s the over/under on the number of lawsuits that will be filed trying to stop it? — but the fact is, the law is already in place that will allow Trump to go forward.

As in other areas of immigration enforcement, Trump will be able to effect radical change simply by following the law. In this case, it is the Secure Fence Act, passed in 2006 with bipartisan support — 283 votes in the House and 80 in the Senate, including then-Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton.

Read more by Byron York at washingtonexaminer.com

How Eisenhower solved illegal border crossings from Mexico

George W. Bush isn’t the first Republican president to face a full-blown immigration crisis on the US-Mexican border.

Fifty-three years ago, when newly elected Dwight Eisenhower moved into the White House, America’s southern frontier was as porous as a spaghetti sieve. As many as 3 million illegal migrants had walked and waded northward over a period of several years for jobs in California, Arizona, Texas, and points beyond.

President Eisenhower cut off this illegal traffic. He did it quickly and decisively with only 1,075 United States Border Patrol agents – less than one-tenth of today’s force. The operation is still highly praised among veterans of the Border Patrol.

Read more by John Dillin from csmonitor.com, July 6, 2006

Mexico wants a wall — and is willing to pay for it

Some Mexicans are demanding their government build a wall to stop illegal immigration.

Into their country.

Despite having tough immigration laws, Mexico finds itself under siege by an invasion of refugees seeking to flee the violence in Central America. Some of them want to get to the United States.

From the Daily Mail:

–SNIP–

The US has sent $75 million for equipment and training to Mexico to help with the crackdown on immigrants, according to the Times.

Typical of our idiot president to worry about protecting someone else’s border instead of our own.

Read more by Don Surber

Trump in Mexico recalls Reagan in Geneva

Donald Trump’s surprise visit to Mexico, where he met the Mexican president and discussed the many contentious issues between our two countries, reminds me of President Reagan’s important trip to Geneva in 1985. Reagan was more than willing to sit down with the Communist leader of the USSR in an effort to build a personal connection between the two men without sacrificing America’s vital interests in the Cold War.

Voters finally have the opportunity to choose a president who will make America first by securing our border and ending one-sided trade deals that favor foreign workers rather than our own. Trump’s strong stance in his meeting with the Mexican president demonstrates that Donald Trump is the “choice, not an echo.”

Read more by Phyllis Schlafly at WND.com

US Radar Has Detected Hundreds of Illegal Low-Flying Aircraft Attempting to Cross Border From Mexico

Hundreds of illegal U.S.-Mexico border-crossing attempts by low-flying aircraft have been detected in the last 21 months, according to a U.S. border protection official.

U.S. radar spotted 335 “suspected cross-border attempts” by aircraft at low altitudes between July of 2014 and June of 2015, and 59 suspected attempts from July 2014 to March 31, said Carlos Diaz, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection spokesman.

A Mexico City newspaper reported this week that Mexican drug cartels have operated huge fleets of small planes and established more than 4,700 clandestine runways in Mexico to ship drugs to the border region.

Read more by Mark Browne at CNSnews.com