Efficient Government Agencies

How to cut government spending where bureaucrats will WANT to cut!

It is a well known and quite understandable reaction of any bureau to make sure that the current year’s budget has been spent by the end of the fiscal year, even on unnecessary projects, else they lose it. Personal interest should have every employee watching for any possible waste of the taxpayer’s dollars.

A new budgeting policy for each bureau should be established, where any unspent budgeted funds at the end of the fiscal year shall be equally divided up and paid out to all of the employees in that bureau, and, then the lower budget figure, pre-disbursement, would be used for the next fiscal year, with, again, any unspent surplus being distributed to the employees who made the surplus possible.

No money would be saved the first year, but from then on every department would have continuously lowering budgets. Could the cost of running the state be cut in half in three years? I think so. The bottom line would be far more efficient and less costly state services.

(Idea from Wayne Green)

The Real Reason College Tuition Costs So Much

ONCE upon a time in America, baby boomers paid for college with the money they made from their summer jobs. Then, over the course of the next few decades, public funding for higher education was slashed. These radical cuts forced universities to raise tuition year after year, which in turn forced the millennial generation to take on crushing educational debt loads, and everyone lived unhappily ever after.

This is the story college administrators like to tell when they’re asked to explain why, over the past 35 years, college tuition at public universities has nearly quadrupled, to $9,139 in 2014 dollars. It is a fairy tale in the worst sense, in that it is not merely false, but rather almost the inverse of the truth.

Read more by Paul F. Campos at NYTimes.com

Green Bay Students Would Benefit from Educational Options

Governor Scott Walker’s budget proposal was big on money for K-12 public education – to the tune of more than $600 million over 2 years – but small on expanding education options for Wisconsin families. Fortunately the Governor isn’t the only one with a say on this matter. A day after Walker’s budget address, State Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald said lifting the caps on enrollment for the statewide school voucher program, Wisconsin Parental Choice Program was “absolutely” something the Senate Republicans would consider.

This is promising news. The current unfair enrollment caps and income limitations placed on the choice program are arbitrarily hindering growth and shutting the schoolhouse door on Green Bay families looking for education options.

–SNIP–The Wisconsin Parental Choice Program (WPCP) allows eligible families to use a state-funded voucher to send their child to a private school of their choosing. This gives alternatives to the traditional education system that the evidence shows produce better results for students—and we don’t even have to look outside of Wisconsin for the evidence of this. The school choice program in Milwaukee has been quite beneficial in improving the educational outcomes for kids in the City. Academic studies have shown that students in choice schools are more likely to graduate, have higher test scores, and are less likely to become involved in criminal activity. The success has led to rapid growth in the program, with more than 27,000 students enrolled during the previous school year.

Read more by Will Flanders & Collin Roth at rightwisconsin.com

Cut a Penny from the Budget

–SNIP– But if you are an anti-tax conservative who sincerely believes that you have to cut spending and not “feed the beast” with more revenues, then one approach on spending cuts for the super committee to consider is the simple and creative “Penny Plan” introduced by Rep. Connie Mack, R-Fla.

Mr. Mack’s bill, H.R. 1848, would cut one penny out of every dollar actually spent by the federal government from year to year for the next six years, from FY 2012-FY 2017.

Beginning in FY 2018, there would be a budget cap of 18 percent of GDP (the average federal revenue as a percentage of GDP over the past 30 years). And by FY 2019, America would finally have a balanced budget — that is, assuming revenues naturally increase from the current 14.8 percent of GDP to 18 percent of GDP by 2019, after which the budget would be in surplus.

There is an automatic spending cut “trigger” under Mack’s plan — one he came up with well before the trigger used in the recently passed national debt ceiling bill.

If Congress failed to enact a budget implementing the 1 percent actual spending cut required under Mack’s measure, then there would be automatic, across-the-board actual cuts in all federal programs to meet the 1 percent reduction, and that means all: in defense, Social Security, Medicare, Food Stamps, defense, and national security spending. Everything.

Read more by Lanny Davis at NewsMax.com, 2011

Efficient Government Agencies

How to cut government spending where bureaucrats will WANT to cut!

It is a well known and quite understandable reaction of any bureau to make sure that the current year’s budget has been spent by the end of the fiscal year, even on unnecessary projects, else they lose it. Personal interest should have every employee watching for any possible waste of the taxpayer’s dollars.

A new budgeting policy for each bureau should be established, where any unspent budgeted funds at the end of the fiscal year shall be equally divided up and paid out to all of the employees in that bureau, and, then the lower budget figure, pre-disbursement, would be used for the next fiscal year, with, again, any unspent surplus being distributed to the employees who made the surplus possible.

No money would be saved the first year, but from then on every department would have continuously lowering budgets. Could the cost of running the state be cut in half in three years? I think so. The bottom line would be far more efficient and less costly state services.

(Idea from Wayne Green)